Finance

As she prepares for graduation, Carson Guinn credits her parents for inspiring her to pursue a career in finance

Dollie Elliott
  (May 2, 2017 at 10:01 am)

Carson Guinn is a senior economics and finance double major with a minor in accounting from Wichita, Kansas. She will graduate from Oklahoma State University on May 13.

Her parents Lynn and Kim Guinn graduated from the T. Boone Pickens College of Business at West Texas A&M University in Canyon, Texas, outside of Amarillo. “Pickens was a large supporter of the school as well as a major supporter of Oklahoma State University. So we have a running joke in my family that although we didn’t graduate from university, we have the same alma mater because T. Boone Pickens is such a huge supporter of Oklahoma State. So we’re kind of all Cowboys,” said Guinn. Continue Reading

Four OSU business students qualify to compete at
Phi Beta Lambda National Leadership Conference

Ariel West
  (April 28, 2017 at 1:27 pm)

From left, Kalina Keester, Anna Hudson, adviser Vicki Johansen, Sydney Lauderno and Kayla Roberts had a round of achievements at the PBL State Conference.

Four Oklahoma State University business students will be traveling to Anaheim, California, to compete in the 2017 Phi Beta Lambda National Leadership Conference in June.

Earlier in April, management junior Anna Hudson, international business junior Kalina Keester, accounting junior Sydney Laudero and finance junior Kayla Roberts competed at the PBL State Conference hosted by Tulsa Community College-Metro. All four placed in the top three of their respective competitions to qualify for the National Leadership Conference. OSU Spears School of Business academic counselor Vicki Johansen also attended the conference as the OSU PBL chapter adviser. Continue Reading

Spears School Alumni Q&A with Tim Woods

Dollie Elliott
  (April 25, 2017 at 12:11 pm)

Timias “Tim” Woods, originally from Tulsa, Okla., received a bachelor’s degree in both business administration and economics from Oklahoma State University in 2008. He recently visited the Stillwater campus to speak to Nancy Titus-Piersma’s Real Estate Finance class to share his experiences in the real estate industry.

Woods is the National Director of Asset Services for Matthews Real Estate Investment Services in Dallas. Currently, he is focused on growing a new division at the firm and tapping into new sources of revenue.

Why did you choose to major in business?

I think I originally wanted to go into banking when I first started as a freshman. I chose economics as a major after finishing Econ 101. Something about the graphs and adjusting demand/supply curves based on the scenario provided intrigued me. Continue Reading

11th annual OSU Energy Conference in Tulsa
will feature some of nation’s top experts

Alyssa Wahrman
  (April 18, 2017 at 8:03 am)

OSU Energy ConferenceThe 11th annual Oklahoma State University Energy Conference in Tulsa will feature the nation’s top experts in the energy industry discussing issues making today’s headlines.

The conference is from 8:45 a.m. to 1:15 p.m. May 10 at the Renaissance Hotel. Registration and a continental breakfast will begin at 8 a.m.

This conference is hosted by the OSU Department of Finance and the Center for Executive and Professional Development in the Spears School of Business in association with the Natural Gas and Energy Association of Oklahoma.

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Top experts will be speaking at
11th annual OSU Energy Conference in OKC

Alyssa Wahrman
  (April 18, 2017 at 7:58 am)

OSU Energy ConferenceThe 11th annual Oklahoma State University Energy Conference in Tulsa will feature the nation’s top experts in the energy industry discussing issues making today’s headlines.

The conference is from 8:45 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. May 11 at the Cox Convention Center. This conference is hosted by the OSU Department of Finance and the Center for Executive and Professional Development in the Spears School of Business in association with the Natural Gas and Energy Association of Oklahoma.

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Oil and gas finance experts visit OSU to give
students a glimpse of working in the industry

Dollie Elliott
  (April 6, 2017 at 10:05 am)

Betty Simkins (second from right), interim head of the Department of Finance, hosts oil and gas experts as they visit her energy finance class to share the various career opportunities in oil and gas finance. Guest speakers (from left) Curt Jennings, senior marketing representative, Rose Rock Midstream; Ashley Tucker, Business Development – Project Origination, Blueknight Energy Partners, Clint Duty, vice president, engineering and operations, Targa Resources, and Jeff Oliver, president of Firefly Energy Services.

Four oil and gas finance experts recently visited Oklahoma State University to share their experiences with students to assist them in preparing for careers in the industry.

“We strive to bridge the ‘theory/practice’ gap. It is crucial for students to interact with industry professionals to overcome this gap,” said Betty Simkins, professor and interim head of the Department of Finance in the OSU Spears School Business.

The group shared that Oklahoma is one of the country’s prime locations for oil and gas production not only because of the extensive infrastructure but it is home to numerous service providers, making oil and gas production three times more affordable than most other states in the United States. Continue Reading

Spears School Alumni Q&A with Charlotte Du

Dollie Elliott
  (March 28, 2017 at 1:44 pm)

Charlotte Du

Xintong Charlotte Du, originally from Harbin, China, received a bachelor’s degree in hotel and restaurant management with a minor in finance from Oklahoma State University last spring. She recently accepted a full scholarship offer for the University of Wisconsin – Madison’s MBA program where she will concentrate on real estate. She shares her love of OSU and the impact the Spears School had on her undergraduate education.

Why did you choose to attend OSU?

I came to OSU for a dual-degree hospitality program between Sun Yat-Sen University Business School in China and OSU School of Hotel & Restaurant Administration. My passion is the hospitality industry and I knew that in order to go further in the industry, I needed a good understanding of its business side, especially on real estate. So I started a minor in finance at Spears School of Business in my junior year of college.

Charlotte Du at the Real Estate Center at the University of Wisconsin – Madison.

How does it feel to have been accepted into the University of Wisconsin – Madison’s MBA program with a full scholarship?

I am excited and a little bit nervous. I am thrilled to continue my education in real estate at one of the top programs in the nation. I am grateful for this opportunity and the generous fellowship given by the school. At the same time, as one of the youngest MBA candidates in the program with less work experience compared to my future classmates, I know that I will need to work double and triple hard to do well in the program. Nevertheless, I will do the best that I can and carry on my orange spirit up North in Wisconsin.

You have said that Nancy Titus-Piersma, lecturer in the Spears School, was one of your favorite faculty members. Tell us about your relationship and her influence on you as a person and student.

Professor Titus has definitely made a great influence on my career development. I love her class, especially the Friday News Roundups and case studies on significant events like the Financial Crisis. It’s amazing how much she gets us connected to real-life events in her class and those knowledge has proved to be super helpful when I stepped into the real world. I also appreciate her helping me with my career – she even spent time after class showing me how to read and analyze financial statements of my current company so I could be better prepared for my onboarding!

On campus with Pistol Pete

What specific OSU experiences or memories have shaped you as a person?

The two years spent at OSU were definitely two of the best years in my life. Being a part of the Cowboy Cousins and organizing events with some outstanding students from the Spears School of Business, I became more familiar with American culture. By participating in all of the amazing events at the School of Hotel Restaurant and Administration, like Chef Events, OSU Wine Forums and Hospitality Days, I had definitely developed good communication and leadership skills. Since taking finance classes at the Spears School of Business, I have cultivated a good habit of reading and staying updated with business news.

A couple weeks ago I happened to find a list from three years ago about what I wish I would become after graduating from college. I was surprised to find out that I achieved more than half of the things on that list, including being a more confident and assertive person. I think my all of my OSU experiences have shaped me to be a better version of myself. Couldn’t have asked for a more wonderful college experience. I am proud to be a Poke!

Five Spears School of Business students selected
as OSU Seniors of Significance

Spears School News Staff
  (November 28, 2016 at 9:12 am)

Five Spears School of Business students have been selected as Oklahoma State University Seniors of Significance for the 2016-2017 academic year by the OSU Alumni Association.

The Seniors of Significance Award recognizes students who have excelled in scholarship, leadership and service to campus and community and have brought distinction to OSU.

“We are so proud of our Seniors of Significance,” said Spears School Associate Dean Karen Flaherty. “All five recipients are incredibly deserving of this honor. We are thankful for the contributions each one of these students has made to the Spears School of Business community over the past four years.”

The Spears School of Business Seniors of Significance are listed below with their hometown and major: Continue Reading

OSU finance professor becomes first woman
to speak at Saudi university business school

Ariel West
  (November 1, 2016 at 4:18 pm)
Finance professor Betty Simkins wore a traditional abaya to speak at the Saudi university.

Finance professor Betty Simkins wore a traditional abaya to speak at the Saudi university.

Oklahoma State University finance professor Betty Simkins has plenty of international presentation experience, but nothing could prepare her for a presentation at an all-male university in Saudi Arabia.

As the founder and editor for the Journal of Commodity Markets and the Spears School of Business’s expert in all things energy, Simkins regularly visited countries around the globe to teach and present research. In fact, for the past five years Simkins has taught a course at Saudi Aramco, Saudi Arabia’s national oil company and “de facto” leader of OPEC. She’s well-respected in her field, and an invitation to present at the uniquely all-male King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals (KFUPM) business school in Dharhran, Saudi Arabia, proved it.

“One of our former finance PhD students, Mohammed Alzahrani, is now the dean of the business school at KFUPM and wanted me to present there,” Simkins said. “I have been looking forward to presenting there for a while, but traveling to Saudi Arabia is difficult; you have to get a Visa, send off your passport, all that. Mohammed told me that I would be the first woman to present at the university’s business school. All employees are male and the university is ranked number one in the Arab Region by a well know ranking service. I was thrilled to be the first woman to present there and look forward to visiting again.”
Continue Reading

Patel, Hillery, Russell named
Top Freshmen by OSU Mortar Board

Ariel West
  (October 7, 2016 at 10:42 am)

Three outstanding Spears School of Business students were named Top Freshman by the Oklahoma State University Mortar Board for the 2015-2016 academic year.

Peyton Hillery, an accounting major from Wichita Falls, Texas, was selected as a Top 10 Freshman Woman at OSU, while Vishnu Patel, a finance major from Stillwater, and Mason Russell, a management science and information systems major from Norman, were named Top 10 Freshmen Men. The three Spears Business students will be honored along with 17 other OSU freshmen Oct. 8 in the Browsing Room of Edmon Low Library and again during half time of the OSU-Iowa State football game.

Peyton Hillery

Peyton Hillery

Hillery is the daughter of Brent and Linda Hillery and is also a Spears “I Am Building” student, a Spears Business campaign that selected six outstanding business freshmen to represent the first graduating class of the new business building, set to open January 2018. Hillery is a Spears School scholar leader and the finance assistant for the Kappa Alpha Theta sorority. She also serves as the assistant finance director for CowboyThon and a McKnight scholar leader, an out-of-state scholarship and class focused on leadership. Continue Reading

Five Spears School of Business seniors receive
top honors from the Alumni Association

Spears School News Staff
  (March 14, 2016 at 9:08 am)

Five seniors from Spears School of Business have been named 2016 Outstanding Seniors by the Oklahoma State University Alumni Association.

The Outstanding Senior award recognizes seniors who excel through academic achievement; campus and community activities; academic, athletic or extra-curricular honors or awards; scholarships and work ethic during their time at OSU.

The Spears School of Business honorees with their hometowns and majors are:

Aaron Cromer

Aaron Cromer

Charlie Gibson

Charlie Gibson

Brett Humphrey

Brett Humphrey

Allison Meinders

Allison Meinders

Tyler Zander

Tyler Zander

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Three Spears School of Business seniors
receive top honors from OSU Alumni Association

Spears School News Staff
  (March 18, 2015 at 10:26 am)
Catrina Rockholt

Catrina Rockholt

Three seniors from the Spears School of Business have been named 2015 Outstanding Seniors by the Oklahoma State University Alumni Association.

The Outstanding Senior award recognizes seniors who excel through academic achievement; campus and community activities; academic, athletic or extra-curricular honors or awards; scholarships and work ethic during their time at OSU.

The Spears School of Business honorees with their hometowns and majors are:

Catrina D. Rockholt, Charleston, S.C., business management

Erin Scanlan, Portales, N.M., marketing and management

Erin Scanlan

Erin Scanlan

 
Chris Stockton, Duncan, Okla., finance and management

Chris Stockton

Chris Stockton

Twelve seniors were chosen to receive the award by the OSU Alumni Association Student Awards and Selection Committee after it met with the 44 Seniors of Significance selected in the fall of 2014 and reviewed their applications.

A public banquet honoring the Outstanding Seniors will be held April 20 at 6 p.m. at the ConocoPhillips OSU Alumni Center in Stillwater. Tickets may be purchased online at orangeconnection.org/osdinner or by calling 405.744.3600.

For more information about the OSU Alumni Association’s student awards program, visit orangeconnection.org/studentawards or contact Melisa Parkerson at 405.744.8711.

Oklahoma State University business school
to recognize alums during 100th anniversary

Terry Tush
  (October 29, 2014 at 1:26 pm)

Spears School's 100th logoThe Spears School of Business faculty, students, staff and alumni are looking forward with great anticipation to the culminating event as 2014 marks the 100th anniversary of business education at Oklahoma State University.

The Spears School Tributes: 100 For 100 reception and dinner will be Friday, Nov. 7, at the Wes Watkins Center on OSU’s Stillwater campus. The school is recognizing graduates who exemplify the Oklahoma State and business school spirit. These tributes represent a rich history and diversity of experience among those who have earned business degrees from OSU over the past 100 years.

“We are proud to celebrate some of the more than 43,000 graduates since the school was founded in 1914,” said Ken Eastman, dean of the Spears School. “The Tributes represent the diversity of our graduates. These honorees are from various backgrounds, ages and occupations. Each has an inspiring story to tell, and we are proud to have them as part of the Spears School family.”
Continue Reading

Pair join Department of Finance faculty
at OSU’s Spears School of Business

Spears School News Staff
  (August 18, 2014 at 4:34 pm)

Finance-166-KTwo new professors are joining the Department of Finance in the Spears School of Business for the 2014-15 school year. Joining the Spears School faculty are Shu Yan and Jun Zhang.

“We are excited to have Drs. Yan and Zhang join our internationally recognized faculty and provide instruction for our leading edge programs in finance at the undergraduate and graduate levels,” said John Polonchek, head of the Department of Finance. “We expect both to make significant contributions to the teaching and research mission of the Department of Finance.”

Shu Yan

Shu Yan

Yan, who will be an assistant professor and teach undergraduate and master derivative securities in the Department of Finance at Oklahoma State University, was previously on the faculty at the Eller College of Business at the University of Arizona and the Moore School of Business at the University of South Carolina. Continue Reading

Two Spears School seniors recognized
as 2014 Outstanding Seniors

Spears School News Staff
  (March 12, 2014 at 12:12 pm)
Callie Heerwagen

Callie Heerwagen

Two seniors from the Spears School of Business have been named 2014 Outstanding Seniors by the Oklahoma State University Alumni Association.

The Outstanding Senior award recognizes seniors who excel through academic achievement; campus and community activities; academic, athletic or extra-curricular honors or awards; scholarships and work ethic during their time at OSU.

The Spears School of Business Outstanding Seniors with their hometowns and majors are:
Jana Gregory, Edmond, Okla., accounting
Callie Lynn Heerwagen, Edmond, Okla., finance

Jana Gregory

Jana Gregory

Fifteen seniors were chosen to receive the award by the OSU Alumni Association Student Awards and Selection Committee after it met with the 47 Seniors of Significance selected in the fall of 2013 and reviewed their applications.

A public banquet honoring the Outstanding Seniors will be held April 21 at 6:30 p.m. at the ConocoPhillips OSU Alumni Center in Stillwater. Tickets may be purchased online at orangeconnection.org/osdinner or by calling 405.744.8837.

For more information about the OSU Alumni Association’s student awards program, visit orangeconnection.org/awards or contact Melisa Parkerson at 405.744.8711.

Spears School’s Betty Simkins honored
with pair of outreach excellence awards

Krysta Gilbert
  (October 16, 2013 at 3:51 pm)
Betty Simkins

Betty Simkins

Betty Simkins, professor of finance and Williams Companies Professor of Business in the Spears School of Business, is the recipient of two prestigious awards. She will be presented the OSU Outreach Faculty Excellence Award on Dec. 4 at OSU Convocation and was the recipient of the 2013 Richard W. Poole Outreach Faculty Excellence Award in August at the Spears School’s faculty/staff meeting.

Applications for both awards were assessed on the applicant’s quality of service, creativity in program content or delivery, quantity of programmatic contributions and impact of involvement and/or program.

“I am delighted and honored to be selected to receive these awards,” Simkins said. “Before getting my Ph.D., I worked in the industry for Conoco (now ConocoPhillips) and Williams Companies. My past work experience has always kept me focused on the importance of connecting what we teach with the real world, whether in the classroom, in my research, or in executive education. OSU’s activities in outreach are essential in accomplishing this, and I am delighted to be actively involved in these important efforts.”

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Spears School students earn top-20 finish
in prestigious Rotman Trading Competition

Spears School News Staff
  (April 3, 2013 at 3:02 pm)
SSB students at Rotman International Trading Competition

Spears School graduate students, from left, Shenglan He, Alex Berry, Shawn Santo, Jared Sposato, Sheena Narayanan and Layne Krizek at the Rotman International Trading Competition in Toronto.

Six graduate students of the Spears School of Business in the Master’s of Science Quantitative Financial Economics program competed in the Rotman International Trading Competition in Toronto, Canada, in February. The group placed 19th out of 48 schools around the world andsixth among other universities in the United States.

Representing the Spears School were Alex Berry, Shawn Santo, Jared Sposato, Layne Krizek, Sheena Narayanan and Shenglan He.

Some of the schools competing were Texas A&M, Duke and MIT. Also, various universities from outside of the country including Thailand, Italy and Ireland.

The teams competed in trading cases emphasizing different challenges faced by traders.

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Cowboys on Wall Street Video

Dollie Elliott
  (May 17, 2012 at 11:57 am)

 A group of Oklahoma State University finance students accompanied by Betty Simkins, professor and David Carter, associate professor in the Department of Finance, recently visited Wall Street where they viewed the ringing of the opening bell at the New York Stock Exchange.

Click image to view Fox Business News video of OSU students on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Video from Fox Business News

Cowboys on Wall Street Photo Gallery

Dollie Elliott
  (May 14, 2012 at 4:18 pm)

 A group of Oklahoma State University finance students accompanied by Betty Simkins, professor and David Carter, associate professor in the Department of Finance, recently visited Wall Street where they viewed the ringing of the opening bell at the New York Stock Exchange.

  Continue Reading

OSU partners with Iraq’s Basrah University

Terry Tush
  (October 28, 2011 at 9:34 am)

Iraqi visitors Watson Trading Floor
For nearly two weeks Oklahoma State University hosted three professors from Iraq’s Basrah University, showing them American customs and introducing them to western teaching styles and curriculum.

The Iraqi faculty members – Abdul-Khaliq Y. Zaier Al-Badran of Basrah’s petroleum engineering department, Abdulzahra Khu Raheem Alaliawi of the university’s finance department, and Majid Abdulnabi Alwan Al-Tameemi of the computer science department – arrived at OSU on Oct. 16 as part of a $1 million grant OSU and Basrah University received from the U.S. Department of State’s Iraqi Linkage Program. They left to return home Oct. 27.

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Headline News: Week of Oct. 24, 2011

Terry Tush
  (October 24, 2011 at 3:08 pm)

Spears Headline News

Spears Headline News: Week of Oct. 24, 2011

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Posted In: Finance Headline News

OSU, Spears School welcome professors
from Iraq’s Basrah University

Terry Tush
  (October 19, 2011 at 11:16 am)

Basra professors and Spears School Dean Larry Crosby
Three faculty members from Basrah University in Iraq arrived in Oklahoma on Oct. 16 to explore Oklahoma State University and familiarize themselves with American curriculum and western teaching styles. They will be staying through Oct. 27.

The Iraqi faculty members – Abdul-Khaliq Y. Zaier Al-Badran, Abdulzahra Khu Raheem Alaliawi, and Majid Abdulnabi Alwan Al-Tameemi – came to OSU as part of a $1 million grant OSU and Basrah University received from the U.S. Department of State’s Iraqi Linkage Program.

Throughout the next three years, numerous Basrah University faculty members will work closely with Oklahoma State faculty from the School of Chemical Engineering, the School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, and the Department of Finance to review Basrah University’s current curriculum and to help the Iraqi university develop a more student-centered, interactive pedagogy.

“We are incredibly honored to host this program,” said John Polonchek, head of the Department of Finance in OSU’s Spears School of Business and co-principal investigator for the grant project. “This is just the first group we’ll be hosting. In the next three years, we expect additional visits by other faculty cohorts.”

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OSU finance alumnus inducted into Oklahoma Hall of Fame

Spears School News Staff
  (November 5, 2010 at 8:16 pm)

“Being inducted into the Hall of Fame is the highest honor Oklahomans can receive for their contributions to our state,” Rich said.

Country music singer and guitarist Ty England was also honored Thursday, as the 2010 Ambassador of Goodwill.

Kristin Chenoweth

Chenoweth is a Broken Arrow native and Oklahoma City University graduate who is known for her performances on stage, television and film.

She won a Tony Award in 1999 for her role as Sally in “You’re a Good Man Charlie Brown.” Chenoweth was later nominated again for her performance as Glinda in “Wicked.”

In addition to those and other performances on Broadway, Chenoweth has appeared in a variety of television shows and films, including the TV series “Pushing Daisies.” Chenoweth earned an Emmy Award for Best Supporting Actress for her role in that show.

Chenoweth supports a number of charitable organizations and campaigns, including a national animal organization called Maddie’s Corner. Her autobiography, “A Little Bit Wicked: Life, Love and Faith,” was a New York Times Best-Seller.

Chenoweth started her acting career as a rabbit in a kindergarten production. Chenoweth said she doesn’t remember the performance, but her mom said she stole the show. The next year, Chenoweth landed the part of a mean teacher. The role was intended for another student, but Chenoweth told the directors she could do it better.

Chenoweth said her induction into the Oklahoma Hall of Fame means as much to her family as it does to her.

“It’s the biggest honor I’ve ever received because it represents my home, my family, my upbringing, my roots — things that I always want to get back to whenever I can,” Chenoweth said. “It’s a gift to get to be back home to receive this.”

Robert A. Hefner III

Hefner is founder and owner of The GHK Company, an oil and natural gas firm in Oklahoma City. He started the company in 1959, two years after graduating from the University of Oklahoma with a degree in geology.

Hefner has spoken to members of Congress, presidents and world leaders about energy policy. His company is known for pioneering natural gas exploration in western Oklahoma. Hefner helped to found OU’s Energy Center. He serves on a number of state and international organizations, including the American Clean Skies Foundation.

Hefner and his wife, MeiLi, established a program called the Hefner Initiative, which funds trips to China for Oklahoma students and works to develop positive relations with China.

Hefner and his wife have three children, seven grandchildren and a great-grandchild.

Hefner’s father, Robert Hefner Jr., and grandfather, Judge Robert Hefner, are also members of the Oklahoma Hall of Fame.

“It makes it very, very special for me to follow in their footsteps,” Hefner said. “It’s a profound honor and responsibility. I think it just increases the responsibility for stepping up to the state and helping the state grow and move forward.”

Edward F. Keller

Keller is the nonexecutive chairman of Summit Bank of Tulsa and a member of Mutual of Omaha Bank Holding Corporation’s board of directors.

He was born in Nowata and raised in Dewey. Keller played baseball for Oklahoma State University, where he earned a degree in finance.

During his earlier career, Keller worked at banks in Bartlesville, Blackwell and Claremore. In 1978, he became executive vice president of First Oklahoma Bancorporation. Keller has also been chairman and CEO of Bank IV, BankOne Oklahoma and J.P. Morgan Chase Oklahoma.

Keller is a member of the board for the St. Francis Health System. He has chaired a number of organizations, including the Oklahoma Bankers Association, the Oklahoma State University Regents and the Metropolitan Tulsa Chamber of Commerce. Keller was also chairman of the OSU-Tulsa Board of Trustees after he helped to bring the public-supported research university to Tulsa.

Keller and his wife, Marilyn, have four children and seven grandchildren. Keller said his induction into the Oklahoma Hall of Fame was a recognition of what he has been able to do with the help of many others.

“I’ve always thought that individual honors were really made upon the shoulders of others,” Keller said. “I come to this knowing full well that while I may be recognized, another hundred, perhaps thousands of people, made all this possible.”

Judy Love

Love and her husband, Tom, started Love’s Travel Stops and Country Stores in 1964. Love worked for the company full-time for 11 years before she returned to school to study interior design. She is secretary of the corporation and chairwoman of Love’s Family Foundation.

Love graduated from Bishop McGuinness High School in Oklahoma City. The school has a theater award in her name and a gymnasium in her father’s name.

Love serves on a number of boards, including boards for the St. Anthony’s Foundation, the Oklahoma City Museum of Art and the Oklahoma City Community Foundation. She has been honored with the Lifetime Achievement Award and Distinguished Woman Award from Oklahoma City University and the Outstanding Philanthropist Award from the Oklahoma City Chapter of the National Fundraising Professionals, among other honors.

Love and her husband have four children and nine grandchildren. Tom Love, who is also a member of the Oklahoma Hall of Fame, presented his wife for induction during Thursday’s ceremony.

“Tom and I both feel the whole thing is a wonderful tribute to the family and something that hopefully the children and grandchildren will be very proud of,” Judy Love said.

Michael C. Turpen

Turpen is a Tulsa native and University of Tulsa graduate with a decorated legal career. He is a partner in the law firm Riggs, Abney, Neal, Turpen, Orbison and Lewis, and a former Oklahoma attorney general.

In 1975, the Oklahoma Bar Association selected Turpen as Oklahoma’s Outstanding Young Lawyer. Ten years later, Turpen argued before the U.S. Supreme Court. He served as district attorney for Muskogee County from 1977 to 1982.

Former President Bill Clinton appointed Turpen to serve on the Kennedy Center Board in Washington, D.C. In 2009, Gov. Brad Henry appointed Turpen to serve on the Oklahoma State Regents for Higher Education.

Turpen is president of the Lyric Theatre and a member of the boards of Allied Arts, the Oklahoma State Fair, and the Oklahoma City National Memorial and Museum.

He is married to wife, Susan, and has three children. Turpen said his daughter, Sarah, was proud of him, but she attended Thursday’s ceremony to see Chenoweth. Turpen was excited to share the celebration with friends and family.

“It’s one of the highest honors in my life because I get to share it with my mother, my wife, my family and my friends,” Turpen said.

Lew O. Ward III

Ward, an oil and gas producer from Enid, is chairman of Ward Petroleum Corp. He was born in Oklahoma City.

Ward’s father worked as a driller, pusher and drilling superintendent. When Ward was old enough, he started working as a roustabout and roughneck during summers.

Ward graduated from the University of Oklahoma in 1953 with a degree in petroleum engineering. He served in the United States Army during the Korean War. After his military tour, Ward started working for Delhi-Taylor Oil Corporation in Tulsa.

In 1956, Ward and his wife, Myra, moved to Enid, where Ward and his father-in-law formed Ward-Gungoll Oil Investments. In 1963, Ward founded what became known as the Ward Petroleum Corporation. He has founded several other companies.

Ward is a former president of the Independent Petroleum Association of America, among other organizations. He serves on several boards, and received the Oklahoma Military Academy Distinguished Alumnus Award, among other honors.

“I feel like it’s an awesome responsibility,” Ward said. “The situation in Oklahoma has been one of progress, and we’re building on that progress.”

Posted In: Finance

OSU finance department holds alumni weekend

Spears School News Staff
  (October 26, 2010 at 4:20 pm)

“In addition, MSQFE alums are active participants in assessment of the Program’s outcomes. Saturday morning, alums in attendance evaluated presentations made by current MSQFE students. Student teams prepared “Critical Evaluations of the Public/Private Investment Program” for this year’s case competition.

Oklahoma State University is a modern land-grant system that cuts across disciplines to better prepare students for success. Oklahoma’s only university with a statewide presence, OSU improves the lives of people in Oklahoma, the nation, and the world. The Spears School of Business is dedicated to the original land-grant vision of integrated, high-quality teaching, research and outreach. For more information, call 405-744-5064 or visit spears.okstate.edu.

Posted In: Finance

Chicago Trading Company director speaks to advanced finance students

Spears School News Staff
  (October 20, 2010 at 2:56 pm)
Posted In: Finance

Is a woman’s touch gold?

Spears School News Staff
  (October 14, 2010 at 1:54 pm)

As the Enron scandal heightened public scrutiny on corporate boards of directors, Carter joined with Simpson and Betty Simkins to study the impact women directors had on 2003 corporate financial results. They approached this by statistically factoring out time-sensitive issues, such as the lingering 9/11 recession and natural gas trading scandal, and differences separating the economic sectors of these S&P companies, such as banking and manufacturing.

That provided a constant for comparing base earnings to board composition, all without trying to judge the value of women directors, their different insights or their decision-making processes.

“We don’t actually trace it through everything that happens,” said Simpson, explaining how the study didn’t analyze individual board actions. “We just look at the number of women on the board and what is the result.”

Their first paper, covering 2003 financial results, found a definitive correlation between rising corporate profits and the percentage of women on the board. Simpson said that positive result drew their study widespread attention and numerous research and corporate citings.

Their second study, which added data through 2007, proved far less conclusive.

“Normally when you have a really nice positive relationship, the methodology will often be robust,” said Carter. “That this is not, it tells me that the relationship is sort of at the margin.

“I guess the bottom line is that there’s still no definitive answer,” he said. “The results are still very sensitive to the methodology used.”

That led Simpson to a bottom-line contingency view.

“That is the way of a lot of things in the world,” he said. “Unfortunately for anybody who wants a good clean result, basically it depends on the company. Some companies may find benefits from having diversity and some may find it a negative.”

Carter turned that around.

“On a minimum level, this study shows that bringing qualified women on boards does not harm the company,” he said.

“It’s not a positive or a negative,” said Simpson.

The Journal of Applied Finance, edited by Simkins, will soon publish a third paper summarizing their conclusions along with other related studies. Simkins, OSU’s Williams Cos. professor of business, will discuss these topics at a two-day Harvard University conference starting Friday.

The OSU study found women held about 11 percent of the 13,000 board seats among these companies, most chosen from outside the company.

About 47 percent of the S&P 1,500 had one or more women directors, according to the OSU study. That fell to 26 percent of the S&P Small Cap firms.

“One thing that does come out is that larger companies have more women, either as a percentage or absolute numbers,” said Simpson. “Even if you take the difference between the S&P 500 and the S&P 1,500, the S&P 500 will have more women.”

Those results parallel Catalyst data that found women occupied 11 percent of Fortune 1,000 company board seats. About 25 percent of those firms have no women board members at all.

That could reflect upward mobility limitations perceived in many corporate cultures, often called the “glass ceiling,” that has confronted career women the last 50 years. Since many boards select upper management leaders for both internal and outside board positions, Simpson said fewer women fit that bill than men.

Those women selected usually represent corporate outsiders, he said, drawn from consulting fields, academics or medicine. Such areas fit many corporate strategies to secure “outside the box” views from board members.

“I think anything a company can do to think outside the box is good,” said Simkins. “Having a board of directors where everybody is a good ole boy club, there’s less chance that people will think outside the box.”

Simpson carried that board diversity issue back to their thesis question on whether having women directors boosts company profitability.

“Even though you cannot statistically nail down beyond a shadow of a doubt whether this is true,” he said, “that does not change the social justice issue that qualified women still have an equal right to serve on boards. It may mean we need to break those things apart. To me, it’s not muddled that qualified women, men, ethnic minorities deserve equal opportunities to serve on boards.”

Posted In: Finance

Study investigates impact of women directors

Spears School News Staff
  (October 14, 2010 at 1:44 pm)

The conference will examine the economic value of gender diversity in business, politics and society. Simkins said it will feature many leading experts from around the world, including representatives from the Council of Women World Leaders, the World Economic Forum and Goldman Sachs. The keynote speaker for the conference is Hillary Clinton, U.S. secretary of state.

At the conference, Simkins will serve on a panel titled “The Organizational Perspective: Gender Diversity in Boards.” Simkins, along with fellow OSU finance faculty members Gary Simpson and David Carter, have been conducting research about this topic since 2001.

“I am honored and thrilled to go and be a panelist,” Simkins said. “I think this is an important issue, and I am excited to be a part of such an extraordinary event. I look forward to sharing information about the significance of having women serve on corporate boards and hearing the experts speak.”The researchers’ interest was piqued by the development of the Enron auditing scandal in October of that year.

“Presumably, it should be the board of directors who ensure the top management does the right thing,” Carter said. “A lot of people began to look at boards very closely after the Enron scandal. The bottom line: Is there some way we can structure the boards so they do the right thing? This research is a part of that.”

Simpson said the researchers have explored two research areas: 1) the current status of women on boards and 2) whether companies with women membership on boards of directors perform better. The researchers analyzed 13,000 board seats each year.

Throughout seven years of research, the team found women hold only 11percent to 12 percent of board of director seats, and this number has been fairly static throughout the research. Larger companies are more likely to have at least one female director on their board.

The researchers said they have also identified that women who do serve on boards tend to be independent and younger than their male counterparts. They are more likely than men to have backgrounds in consulting, academics and medicine, rather than finance or real estate. Finally, women are less likely to chair committees or serve as the CEO of a company.

In regard to the investigation into whether companies that have women on their boards of directors perform better, the researchers have received mixed results. The researchers found that between 2002 and 2003, women involvement in boards of directors positively affected company profitability. Several years later, the data showed that women involvement in boards of directors made no impact on company profitability.

“At first, I thought maybe it was just prejudice,” Simpson said. “Most boards are dominated by aging, Caucasian men. So, I thought it’s just difficult for a female. Now, I think it’s more complicated than that.”

Carter said he believes these issues are important to a company and will continue to be, especially as more women enter the corporate workforce.

“If you have 10 guys with a certain, fairly homogenous point of view, you’ll get a certain answer,” Carter said. “But add some people who are different, and maybe you’ll come up with something different. Essentially that’s what we’re saying; Women may not be a perfect substitute for men on boards, simply because they have different backgrounds and different experiences. Mixing it could produce something better.”

Posted In: Finance

OSU Department of Finance receives donation from NGEAO

Spears School News Staff
  (October 6, 2010 at 3:12 pm)

Oklahoma State University is a modern land-grant system that cuts across disciplines to better prepare students for success. Oklahoma’s only university with a statewide presence, OSU improves the lives of people in Oklahoma, the nation, and the world. The Spears School of Business is dedicated to the original land-grant vision of integrated, high-quality teaching, research and outreach. For more information, call 405-744-5064 or visit spears.okstate.edu.

Posted In: Finance

OSU study investigates impact of women directors on company profitability

Spears School News Staff
  (September 27, 2010 at 2:49 pm)

The conference will examine the economic value of gender diversity in business, politics and society. Simkins said it will feature many leading experts from around the world, including representatives from the Council of Women World Leaders, the World Economic Forum and Goldman Sachs. The keynote speaker for the conference is Hillary Clinton, U.S. Secretary of State.

At the conference, Simkins will serve on a panel titled “The Organizational perspective: Gender Diversity in Boards.” Simkins, along with fellow OSU finance faculty members Gary Simpson and David Carter, have been conducting research about this topic since 2001.

“I am honored and thrilled to go and be a panelist,” Simkins said. “I think this is an important issue, and I am excited to be a part of such an extraordinary event. I look forward to sharing information about the significance of having women serve on corporate boards and hearing the experts speak.”

The researchers’ interest was piqued by the development of the Enron auditing scandal in October of that year.

“Presumably, it should be the board of directors who ensure the top management does the right thing,” Carter said. “A lot of people began to look at boards very closely after the Enron scandal. The bottom line: is there some way we can structure the boards so they do the right thing? This research is a part of that.”

Simpson said the researchers have explored two research areas: 1) the current status of women on boards and 2) whether companies with women membership on boards of directors perform better. The researchers analyzed 13,000 board seats each year.

Throughout seven years of research, the team found women hold only 11 to 12 percent of board of director seats, and this number has been fairly static throughout the research. Larger companies are more likely to have at least one female director on their board.

The researchers said they have also identified that women who do serve on boards tend to be independent and younger than their male counterparts. They are more likely than men to have backgrounds in consulting, academics and medicine, rather than finance or real estate. Finally, women are less likely to chair committees or serve as the CEO of a company.

In regard to the investigation into whether companies that have women on their boards of directors perform better, the researchers have received mixed results. The researchers found that between 2002 and 2003, women involvement in boards of directors positively affected company profitability. Several years later, the data showed that women involvement in boards of directors made no impact on company profitability.

“At first, I thought maybe it was just prejudice,” Simpson said. “Most boards are dominated by aging, Caucasian men. So, I thought it’s just difficult for a female. Now, I think it’s more complicated than that.”

Carter said he believes these issues are important to a company and will continue to be, especially as more women enter the corporate workforce.

“If you have ten guys with a certain, fairly homogenous point of view, you’ll get a certain answer,” Carter said. “But add some people who are different, and maybe you’ll come up with something different. Essentially that’s what we’re saying; women may not be a perfect substitute for men on boards, simply because they have different backgrounds and different experiences. Mixing it could produce something better.”

Posted In: Finance

OSU one of five US universities chosen to participate in Iraqi partnership

Spears School News Staff
  (July 15, 2010 at 1:27 pm)

The program consists of partnerships between five American institutions and five universities in Iraq that will focus on curriculum review, the development of online courses, real-time instruction via videoconferencing, career development, and faculty, staff, and student exchanges.

Representatives of four of the American institutions involved—Ball State University, Oklahoma State University, the University of Cincinnati, and the University of Kentucky—were in Baghdad to begin working out the specifics of their collaborations with their Iraqi counterparts. (Delegates from the fifth American institution, Cleveland State University, were unable to attend because of travel difficulties.)

The American universities were selected by the Academy for Educational Development, a nonprofit organization that is administering the three-year program’s $6-million grant in partnership with the State Department. The organization, known as AED, focuses on education, health, and social and economic-development projects.

Sandra MacDonald-Davis, director of the Center for Academic Partnerships at AED, says that the organization’s call for proposals prompted interest from nearly 30 American universities. Finalists were selected on the basis of specific academic expertise they offered, and the needs of the Iraqi universities they were matched with. Partner institutions will be collaborating in areas such as business administration, engineering, information technology, and English-language education.

Oklahoma State’s participation, for example, was solicited after AED officials realized that they did not have an American university that would be a good fit for the petroleum-engineering expertise the University of Basrah wanted.

Striving to Improve

The University of Kufa, in Najaf, in southern Iraq, is just a few months away from finishing construction of a brand-new campus, and does not face the infrastructure problems that still beleaguer so many other Iraqi institutions. Nonetheless, its president, Razzak Al-Essa, is looking forward to making the most of the opportunities the new links will provide. “Yes, we have a good grade compared to other Iraqi universities, but we are behind if I compare our university with a Western university,” he says. “We have a shortage of labs, of books, and we are now behind on the latest things that are happening in the very good universities around the world.”

Mr. Al-Essa’s institution has been paired with the University of Kentucky, which will help Kufa develop programs in civil engineering, business administration, and English as a second language. Jeannine Blackwell, dean of the graduate school at Kentucky, was in Iraq for the conference and says that Mr. Al-Essa’s eagerness for his university to rejoin the international academic community was typical of the sentiment from the Iraqi participants.

“They are really ready to get back into collaborative mode with other universities and other faculties,” she says. “Even if you’re just 10 years behind in keeping up with new developments in teaching and research, that’s a huge chunk of time in intellectual terms,” she notes.

George Blandford, chairman of Kentucky’s department of civil engineering, visited Kufa while he was in Iraq and calls its new engineering building “pretty phenomenal.” Still, the institution lags behind in some measures, such as the percentage of faculty members with doctorates. Only eight of Kufa’s 77 civil-engineering faculty members have Ph.D.’s, he says, so one goal of Kentucky’s collaboration will be on eventually increasing the number of Kufa faculty with doctorates.

Mutual Benefits

The linkages are intended to benefit both American and Iraqi participants, and Mr. Blandford envisions a potentially longer-term connection between Kentucky and Kufa after State Department sponsorship ends. “We are a Ph.D.-granting institution and we are very interested in enhancing our Ph.D. capabilities,” he says.

In the long term, he hopes that more Iraqi academics come to Kentucky to pursue their doctorates. In the short term, however, the focus will be on curriculum review, conducted in part through videoconferenced joint faculty meetings, with plans for Kufa faculty members to visit the Kentucky campus sometime this winter.

One potential hurdle that became apparent to some of the American participants as the Baghdad conference progressed is the extent of the central government’s control over higher education in Iraq.

Kenneth Holland, dean of Ball State’s M. Rinker Sr. Center for International Programs, recalls an Iraqi professor of English relating that “he is not allowed to make any changes to the curriculum without permission.” Ms. Blackwell, too, came away with the impression of a “fairly heavy-handed, centralized control of teaching” in Iraq, but also of a higher-education establishment that is very “interested in moving to a more flexible structure.”

Mr. Al-Essa agrees that universities are looking forward to “liberating” themselves from the ministry’s control over details such as the duration of course terms. “We are asking to do the same things as programs in the U.S or the U.K.,” he says, “Each university should have its own programs.”

Support of Education Ministry

Gary Gaffield, director of the Iraq university-linkages program at AED, emphasizes that the Iraqi education ministry fully backs the program and says the ministry’s degree of control over curricula “might not be as extensive or overbearing as some U.S. faculty members might fear.” Individual instructors and departments often exercise considerable leeway in terms of course content, he says, although the ministry might prescribe such elements as learning goals or the number of courses offered.

The establishment of career centers, another of the program’s principal goals, may also run up against cultural obstacles. “One of the things the Iraqis pointed out to us is that there is no private sector in Iraq,” says Mr. Holland. Students’ expectation after they graduate is to get a government job, and there is little transparency in hiring, with most employment secured through contacts or family and tribal connections.

The Iraqis have been receptive to the idea of career centers, which the State Department identified as a priority. “We recognize that it’s a new concept and were happily surprised by how eager the Iraqi universities were at the idea,” says Ms. MacDonald-Davis. The centers will be developed on “models appropriate for the context in which they’ll be operating,” she says, and will focus on such skills as résumé preparation.

As for Mr. Al-Essa, he emphasizes that the University of Kufa’s new link with Kentucky is just part of a growing portfolio of activity intended to strengthen it. When reached by phone on Thursday in Iraq, he was preparing for a trip to Oregon State University, with which Kufa also has ties, and he hopes to forge connections with many more universities abroad. “Each university would have a specific role,” he says, in helping his own institution build its global profile.

Above photo: Abid Thiab Al-Ojaily (left), Iraqi minister of higher education and scientific research, and Christopher R. Hill (center), U.S. ambassador to Iraq, appeared at a conference in Baghdad in June to inaugurate a program to build stronger ties between universities in their two countries. (Photo by Sterling Tilley)

Posted In: Finance